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William Peace Theatre: MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING

Leggett Theatre, Main Building

Tue Apr 1st, 2014 - Sat Apr 5th, 2014

 Tue, Apr 1st - 07:30 p.m. - 10:00 p.m.
 Wed, Apr 2nd - 07:30 p.m. - 10:00 p.m.
 Thu, Apr 3rd - 07:30 p.m. - 10:00 p.m.
 Fri, Apr 4th - 07:30 p.m. - 10:00 p.m.
 Sat, Apr 5th - 02:00 p.m. - 04:30 p.m.
 Sat, Apr 5th - 07:30 p.m. - 10:00 p.m.

 

A Comedic Play Written By William Shakespeare

William Peace Theatre is delighted to present Much Ado About Nothing, the comedic play written by Sir William Shakespeare, directed by Wade Newhouse, Ph.D., WPU's Associate Professor of English and Assistant Theatre Director.

Much Ado About Nothing is a comedic play by William Shakespeare thought to have been written in 1598 and 1599, as Shakespeare was approaching the middle of his career. The play was included in the First Folio, published in 1623.

Much Ado About Nothing is generally considered one of Shakespeare’s best comedies, because it combines elements of robust hilarity with more serious meditations on honor, shame, and court politics. Like As You Like It and Twelfth Night, Much Ado About Nothing, though interspersed with darker concerns, is a joyful comedy that ends with multiple marriages and no deaths.

Much Ado About Nothing chronicles two pairs of lovers: Benedick and Beatrice (the main couple), and Claudio and Hero (the secondary couple). Benedick and Beatrice are engaged in a very "merry war"; they are both very witty and proclaim their disdain of love. In contrast, Claudio and Hero are sweet young people who are rendered practically speechless by their love for one another. Although the young lovers Hero and Claudio provide the main impetus for the plot, the courtship between the wittier, wiser lovers Benedick and Beatrice is what makes Much Ado About Nothing so memorable. Benedick and Beatrice argue with delightful wit, and Shakespeare develops their journey from antagonism to sincere love and affection with a rich sense of humor and compassion.

By means of "noting" (which sounds the same as "nothing," and which is gossip, rumour, and overhearing), Benedick and Beatrice are tricked into confessing their love for each other, and Claudio is tricked into rejecting Hero at the altar on the erroneous belief that she has been unfaithful. However, Dogberry, a Constable who is a master of malapropisms, discovers the evil trickery of the villain, Don John. In the end, Don John runs away and everyone else joins in a dance celebrating the marriages of the two couples.

The play runs Apr.1-5 at 7:30 p.m. in Leggett Theatre, with a special Matinee performance on the 5th at 2:00 p.m.

Tickets: $18 Adults / $16 Senior Citizens / $16 Alumni / $16 Faculty & Staff / $5 Students / $5 Children

(Note: a 6.75% entertainment tax is included in the ticket price.)

Registration & Tickets

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