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  • September 30, 2016 Manning Music Series Concert: IBMA Bluegrass Festival FREE CONCERT ON THE LAWN William Peace University invites you to a FREE bluegrass concert on Friday, Sept. 30, 2016 at 4 p.m., featuring The Counterclockwise Stage Band (4 p.m.) and the South Carolina Broadcasters (5 p.m.) on our Main Stage, as part of the World of Bluegrass (International Bluegrass Music Association) festival in Raleigh. This free concert kicks off our 5-concert Manning Music Series and the celebration of the Series' 10th Anniversary.  The concert will be performed on the Main Lawn. Free parking in any of our University lots. Registration is required. REGISTER HERE. Bring a picnic, your lawn chairs, or a blanket and enjoy this free bluegrass concert made possible through the Manning Music Series Endowment Fund! Refreshments available. (NOTE: Alcohol is prohibited.) #IBMA  #WPU  #MANNING10 William Peace University wishes to make every event accessible to all people in accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act. If you need a reasonable accommodation to fully participate in this event please contact the Office of University Advancement at 919.508.2680. Please make your needs known as soon as possible to allow sufficient time for effective accommodations, preferably at least five business days prior to the event view Event
  • October 15, 2016 Open House Our Office of Admissions would like to invite you and your family to take part in one of our Open House Events. This will give you the opportunity to meet students and faculty, tour our beautiful campus, and learn about the excellent education opportunities available at William Peace University. No matter your level of interest, WPU has something for you! After hanging out with us, be sure to tour #OurRaleigh and take advnatage of our amazing downtown location. Grab lunch or coffee over at Seaboard Station, or pop over to the North Carolina Museum of History or the Governor's Mansion. To RSVP for Open House, please click here. view Event
  • October 28, 2016 WPU Golf Tournament 2016 Tee It High and Let It Fly! Join local and regional golfers at William Peace University's fall golf tournament on October 28, 2016. Proceeds benefit WPU's Pacer Club (Athletics Dept.). REGISTER HERE     Hedingham Golf Club     12:00 p.m. Check-In     1:00 p.m. Shotgun Start     $125 entry fee/$400 per team.     Tee Sponsorships $100 per hole Tickets include:     Cart and Greens fees     Range Balls     Dinner     Two drink tickets     Individual awards     Team prizes     Hole In One Contest     Closest to the Pin Contest Become a Tee Sponsor Tee Sponsorship - $100 Click here and then enter "New Gift" designated to "The Loyalty Fund" restricted to "tee sponsorship" and in the memo line enter your business name. If you would like to send your logo to us after you pay securely online, send it to advancement@peace.edu. Please send a high res EPS or JPG. Questions? Contact Coach Charlie Dobbins at Charlie.Dobbins@peace.edu or 919-508-2330 or Coach Chris Duty at Chris.Duty@peace.edu or 919-508-2331. view Event

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Students wrap-up Archaeological Field School

By on June 15, 2011 3:40 pm

BRUNSWICK COUNTY, N.C. – Hang around an archaeological dig long enough and you’ll hear the word "personal" tossed around frequently. Archaeologists don’t just judge artifacts by their age or condition but also by the story they tell.

Earlier this month during the 2011 Peace College Archaeological Field School at Brunswick Town/Fort Anderson, students learned just how intimate a discovery can be.

 

On the second week of the four-week dig which ended Saturday, Peace students helped unearth a strawberry-shaped pendant from the Civil War era. Only a third of the pendant remained but the unique item gave students a peek into a different world.

"I really can’t put into words how amazing it is to hold something that no one has held or seen for over 200 years," Peace sophomore Kiara Cobb said. "It’s just amazing."

Of the dozens of items recovered during the dig, the pendant — which is likely made of copper alloy and has two layers of painted glass — is the rarest, according to Peace professor Vincent Melomo.

"Something that personal and significant — you might not find one like it ever (again)," Melomo said. "It’s something that meant something to somebody. It is a special find."

This year’s trip to Brunswick Town was the third edition of the Peace Field School and its second visit to the coastal site. The program gives students four lab credit hours as they learn how to sift through dirt, excavate with care, clean artifacts and record data effectively.

In the first field school held four years ago, students explored an old plantation in Louisburg. But organizers switched to the Brunswick Town site because it offered several different time periods in one location.

This year, students found not only Civil War artifacts but also items dating between 300 and 800 years old. The most notable of which were wine bottles, plates, stirrups, an 1863 penny, a canon spike, a pipe with a face carved in it and a confederate lieutenant’s button.

Due to its prestigious rank and the location where it was found, the confederate button can be traced back to just a handful of people.

"It’s almost like a treasure hunt," Peace student Cate Bolenbaugh said. "You’re looking for a piece of pottery or another piece of metal fragment. You don’t know what it is but you have a story behind it. We might not ever know the entire story but based on mapping and digging up things, we can sort of trace (it)."

In addition to uncovering artifacts, the students also helped clear away the brick walls of several Civil War barracks. As they uncovered the walls, they used their knowledge of the typical design and dimension of the buildings to carefully remove dirt without damaging the brick.

Hands-on opportunities like the field school are rare at smaller schools like Peace but offer students the experience they’ll need to pursue a career in archaeology.

 

With the field school now on their resume, students have a leg up when applying to graduate schools and job openings.

"Being here really makes it come to life and is invaluable to your own experience," Cobb said. "It’s more of a personal thing that the books can’t give you."

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