Upcoming Events
  • October 5, 2014 Women's Alumni Softball Game 2014 with a Home Run Derby & Family Cookout William Peace University will host an Alumni Softball Game with Coach Charlie Dobbins on Sunday, October 5 at 12:00 p.m. at WPU's Wachovia Softball Field. 1:00 p.m. - HOME RUN DERBY 2:00 p.m. - BALL GAME Cookout to follow! Green Giants, Peace Pride, and Pacers are all welcome to come home for the Women's Softball Alumni Game! Check out the details on our Facebook page. view Event
  • October 15, 2014 The Importance of Being Earnest William Peace Theatre presents Oscar Wilde's The Importance of Being Earnest, directed by Amy White. Working within the social conventions of late Victorian London, The Importance of Being Earnest is a farcical comedy in which the protagonists maintain fictitious personae to escape burdensome social obligations. The play's major themes are the triviality with which it treats institutions as serious as marriage, and the resulting satire of Victorian ways. Its high farce, humor and witty dialog have helped make The Importance of Being Earnest Wilde's most enduringly popular play. TICKETS: $5 students / $10 Alumni, Senior Citizens, Faculty & Staff / $15 Adults SEATING: General Admission Purchase individual tickets online here. Purchase season tickets online here. view Event
  • October 18, 2014 Classy Cocktails Alumni Reunion William Peace University will celebrate the Peace College reunion years for the classes of 2014, 2009, 2004, 1999, 1994, 1989, 1984 and 1979 during Homecoming & Reunion Weekend 2014. Classy Cocktails has become an annual tradition and includes reunion pinnings during a special reception held in Main Parlor. Come back this year to reminisce and make new memories with your classmates. (Note: The Class of 1964 50th Reunion will be held on April 12, 2015 during a special Reunion Tea hosted by the Alumni Board.) Date: Oct. 18, 2014 Time: 6:00-8:00 p.m. Location: Main Parlor REGISTER HERE view Event

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William Peace University Donates $10,000 To Raleigh City Cemeteries Preservation, Inc.

By William Peace University on August 22, 2013 1:23 pm

William Peace University Donates $10,000
To Raleigh City Cemeteries Preservation, Inc.
Donation To Help Restore Grave Markers Of Institute’s Founder, William Peace,
And His Family As Part Of Group’s Conservation Work

 RALEIGH, N.C. – William Peace University (http://www.peace.edu), a private four-year university located in downtown Raleigh, has announced a $10,000 donation to Raleigh City Cemeteries Preservation, Inc. (RCCP) for the restoration of the grave site and markers of William Peace, founder of the institute, and his family. With this gift, RCCP will be able to complete a large part of the conservation work that is needed at City Cemetery, located at 17 S. East Street.

Peace was a respected Raleigh businessman and church elder who pledged $10,000 to the Rev. Joseph M. Atkinson in trust for the First Presbyterian Church in the mid-19th century. The gift was used to establish the Peace Institute. The Civil War interrupted construction of the university’s Main Building, when the Confederate government used it as a military hospital. After the war, the federal government used the building as the North Carolina headquarters for the Freedmen’s Bureau, which helped former slaves establish new lives. Peace Institute opened its doors to full-time instruction in 1872.

City Cemetery was established by the N.C. General Assembly in 1798, making it the oldest public cemetery in Raleigh. It is located on 7.68 acres bordered by East, New Bern and Hargett streets. In addition to Peace, noted burials include founding fathers of Raleigh, legislators, African-Americans slaves and free men and women, and stone masons from Scotland and England who helped construct the state Capitol building.

Founded in 2006, RCCP is a 501 (C) 3 non-profit that partners with the City of Raleigh and others to promote and provide preservation and restoration of the three city-owned historic public cemeteries: City Cemetery, Mt. Hope Cemetery and O’Rorke Cemetery.

“The City Cemetery holds an incredible amount of Raleigh’s history, and it is important that the entire community join together in order to preserve this site,” said Debra M. Townsley, Ph.D., president of William Peace University. “William Peace University has served as part of Raleigh for more than 150 years, and we are excited to assist in keeping the history of our city alive as we continue to grow. It is an honor to provide support to the Raleigh City Cemeteries Preservation and to help restore the William Peace grave site and family markers.”

“The leaders of William Peace University have made a very generous donation to our preservation efforts of the City Cemetery in Raleigh, and we are thankful for their support,” said Jane B. Thurman, president of RCCP. “With their contribution to our restoration work at the Peace plot, we will be able to complete the second phase of the conservation work at the site. This cemetery represents an important part of our city’s legacy. We hope that additional members of the community will join us in our efforts to complete this project, preservation of a large area that many recognize as the centerpiece of City Cemetery.”

“We are so grateful for the support and donation from William Peace University as the Raleigh City Cemeteries Preservation works to restore City Cemetery,” said Sean Peace, a living relative of William Peace. “Just as William Peace played an integral role in the establishment of the institute, the university now plays a key role in developing the future leaders of our city, state and country. He would have loved to have the school named in his honor, and I am glad that the university is helping his keep his memory alive.”

 

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