Nursing (RN to BSN)

  • Overview

    Getting your BSN means furthering your nursing career in leadership, advanced practice, research, and finding the path that best suits you.

    WPU is the only Triangle university to offer an RN to BSN Program, bringing you flexible class schedules including on campus, online, and on site at partner hospitals such as Wake Med and UNC Rex Healthcare. With six start dates throughout the year, you can build a personalized track and take classes either part-time or full-time. The RN to BSN program at WPU is open to registered nurses with an associates degree in nursing who hold a current and valid RN license in the state of North Carolina. Transfer up to 90 credits and earn your BSN in as little as 12 months.

    The WPU RN to BSN Program offers:

    • 25% discount for Wake Med & UNC Rex Healthcare employees
    • Flexible hybrid classes for working nurses (on campus, online, on site)
    • Opportunity to transfer up to 90 credits
    • Earn your BSN in as little as 12 months
    • Hands-on expert nursing faculty
    • Downtown Raleigh location in close proximity to local hospitals
    • Six convenient start dates throughout the academic year
    • Part-time & full-time classes
    • Cost: $450/credit hour

     

    Promo image for RN to BSN program.
    WPU's BSN Program is designed to help you advance your career at your own pace within a community of nursing learners.
  • Courses

    Beginning in January 2019, William Peace University will offer an RN to BSN program for registered nurses who hold an Associate’s Degree in Nursing and a current, valid RN license in the state of North Carolina. Earning a BSN can help a currently registered nurse to broaden their understanding of nursing practice, expand their potential career opportunities, and help meet the Institute of Medicine’s goal that 80% of registered nurses hold a Bachelor’s degree by 2020 to prepare nurses to care for the growing population with complex issues.

    Nursing is offered as a major (BS) at William Peace University (SPS only).

    Nursing (RN to BSN)

    Associate in Nursing 60 credit hours
    Liberal Education Requirements Up to 30 credit hours

     

    Nursing Requirements
    30 CREDIT HOURS
    NSG 300: Professional Role Transition 2 credits
    NSG 301: Health Assessment 4 credits
    NSG 302: Nursing Leadership and Management 4 credits
    NSG 303: Healthcare Informatics 3 credits
    NSG 400: Health Policy 3 credits
    NSG 401: Research and Evidence-Based Practice 3 credits
    NSG 402: Community Health 4 credits
    NSG 403: Transitions in Case 3 credits
    NSG 404: Nursing Capstone 4 credits
    Total Credit Hours for Bachelor of Science in Nursing 120 credit hours

     

  • Faculty
    WPU professor, Kobie Leiper.
    Assistant Professor of Nursing, RN to BSN Program Director
    Lisa Bonner, Ph.D.
    Department Chair of Science and Mathematics; ​Professor of Biology
  • Careers

    Why is Getting My BSN Important?

    The field of nursing is a quickly growing field; the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) states that registered nurse employment will increase by 19% from 2012-22.

    Earning your BSN eventually is the smartest thing you can do for your nursing career. Why?

    • Payscale.com has just released 2014 data that shows there are major salary difference between people with an RN and a BSN. The RN will earn a median of $39,100, and a BSN holder will earn more than $69,000
    • Keep in mind that a BSN is essential if you ever want to get out of basic clinical care. Many nurses do not want to be working the floor when they are 60 years old. They want to move into administration or teaching. This is possible only with a BSN or higher degree
    • RNs with a diploma usually learn just the basics of clinical care. As a BSN holder, you will have learned much more – communication, critical thinking and leadership skills. These are essential skills if you want to move into higher paying jobs with more responsibility
    • According to a recent study by BurningGlass.com, in a study of 187,000* nurse job posts over three months, an RN diploma was eligible for 51% of positions, while a person with a BSN was eligible for 88%. Further, the study showed that the mean salary for a BSN holder was $10,000 higher

    Note

    This information is couresty of: Nursejournal.org
    *Source: BurningGlass.com (analysis of nurse job postings, 4/25/2013-7/21/2013)

    What Can I do With a BSN?

    While this isn’t an all-encompassing list, this will give you an idea of a typical set of responsibilities for a nurse with a BSN:

    • Developing nursing care treatment plans
    • Treating patients for illnesses, injuries, and other medical condition
    • Providing support to patients and their families in coping with a specific illness or medical condition
    • Educating patients—and the public at large—about how to improve their health habits
    • Supervising other nurses and assign hospital tasks based on patient care plans
    • Administering medications and injections
    • Assisting doctors during surgeries or major procedures
    • Performing routine lab work

    Where Can I Work?

    • Private medical and surgical hospitals: 48% of nurses work in private hospitals. In this setting, you’ll treat a broad spectrum of illnesses and injuries. Some of the most common areas nurses are needed are in surgery, the maternity ward, and the emergency room
    • Physicians’ offices: Working in a physicians’ office generally means less emergency situations and better regularity in hours. Nurses’ duties in a physicians’ office include prepping patients, overseeing records and giving injections
    • Public medical and surgical hospitals: Public hospitals are now less common in the U.S., so fewer nurses are employed there. Working in a public hospital includes assisting in the maternity ward and emergency room, as well as keeping patient records and administering medications
    • Home health care services: You’ll work to make sure your patient receives the medication and care that he or she needs. Patients might be children with medical needs that their parents can’t meet, or they might be adults who are unable to care for themselves
    • Nursing care facilities: Nurse duties in these facilities may include providing elderly patient care, including bathing and assisting in daily activities. Other nursing care facilities provide rehabilitation care for patients who were recently released from the hospitals

    Note

    This information is courtesy of: AllNursingSchools.com

WPU professor, Kobie Leiper.
“Our RN to BSN program is committed to providing a quality education that values professional growth and excellence in patient care."
Kobie Leiper, Ph.D.
Asst. Professor of Nursing/RN to BSN Program Director
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