#PrepareAtPeace: Student Profile of a World-Ranked Gamer, Coleman Arehart ’19

June 14, 2018

On the surface, Coleman Arehart ’19 plays the part of a normal college student. He attends class, hangs out with friends, and plays a LOT of video games in his dorm room. But, dive a little deeper and Coleman is very different from most of his peers. He actually makes money from gaming.

Coleman is well known in the online gaming arena and is a big player in Rocket League, described by most players as soccer, but with rocket-powered cars. The game involves one to four players assigned to each of the two teams, using rocket-powered vehicles to hit a ball into their opponent’s goal and score points over the course of a match.

“I was ranked 45th in the world, and at my peak, I was ranked 16th. That was out of millions of players at the time, and there’s even more now.”

Now, this is where Coleman truly stands out. He’s one of the best players in the world in Rocket League.

“I was ranked 45th in the world, and at my peak, I was ranked 16th. That was out of millions of players at the time, and there’s even more now. Then, I went home for Thanksgiving break and completely ruined my score,” he chuckled.

Coleman estimates his video game earnings at around $1,300, saying he could climb into the $2,000-$3,000 range by the end of the year. Not too shabby for a college student who’s just hanging out and enjoying a hobby.

Many people would ask, “How do you get schoolwork done with all this video game playing?” To that question Coleman has a very simple answer: “I’m a procrastinator, but I like to think that I’m a good one,” he laughed. “When there’s serious stuff going on, I can definitely focus myself and save the play for later.”

Coleman is a Communication major and takes part in the WPU Honors Program, where he has to maintain his GPA and other scholarly requirements in order to keep his academic standing in the program. He’s learned to balance his time between studying and gaming, and has even joked that winning an online match against a high-ranking opponent always puts him in good spirits before attending class.

“They’ll [the WPU professors] put you to work, but they’ll be there for you, for big projects or small homework.”

In line with his Communication major, Coleman is also a blossoming videographer with future plans to create both short films and long form narratives. He has even begun to bridge the gap between his schoolwork and his passion for video games by filming coverage and conducting interviews of a major gaming event in Washington D.C. – a final project in one of his communication classes.

Over his three years at WPU, Coleman has grown his skill set significantly and cites the hands-on work he’s done here as the reason for growth. He also credits the WPU faculty members for their guidance in and outside of the classroom – it’s what drew him to WPU.

“The professors are really nice,” Coleman said. “Especially coming out of a public school, it’s completely different. They’ll put you to work, but they’ll be there for you, for big projects or small homework.”

For more news and feature stories, search #PrepareAtPeace on social media, or visit www.peace.edu/news.

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